Hedonism and the concept of happiness in life

This question has no straightforward answer, because the meaning of the question itself is unclear.

Hedonism and the concept of happiness in life

The refinement of hedonism as an ethical theory involves several surprising and important distinctions. Several counter-examples to hedonism are discussed. Hedonistic theories are one possible answer to the question of "What is intrinsic goodness? Similar theories might involve enjoyment, satisfaction, happiness, as concepts substituted for pleasure.

A major problem of hedonism is getting clear as of what pleasure and pain consist. Are pleasures events, properties, states, or some other kind of entity? Hence, the theory is an inductive generalization from experience by social scientists.

Ethical Hedonism a prescriptive theory whether or not people pursue pleasure, they should or ought to do so. A right action is productive of pleasure; a wrong action is productive of pain. The hedonistic position can be substantially refined.

To say "all pleasure is intrinsically good" is not to say "all pleasure is good, simply. Pain is often good as a means: Pain in this instance would be good as a means. Some pleasures are a means to something more painful and so would not be good: Pleasure is not the only thing desirable—many other things are desirable as means and ends just not intrinsically desirable.

Note especially the distinction between pleasure and the sources of pleasure.

Happiness - Wikipedia

Obviously people get pleasure in different ways. Blurring the distinction between pleasure and the sources of pleasure is often the basis of the mistaken attraction to relativism ; the sources of pleasure can be different for different persons.

The pleasure from the winning of a battle could be the same as the pleasure from the winning of a football game. Think about how this statement is logically related to C. Kleinke, Self-Perception San Francisco: Freeman,2. Nevertheless, the hedonist believes moral goodness is an instrumental good—it is not necessarily an intrinsic good.

Moral goodness is doing the right thing, but this might not lead to happiness. Consider the Nazi doctors performing abortions in prisoner of war camps.

Consider also the problems raised by the teleological suspension of the ethical. One secret to pleasure seems to be to lose yourself in activity. So likewise in work or sports, by being engaged continuously, pleasure is not directly sought.

Things and activity are sought. When hungry, seek food; when poor, seek money; when restless, seek physical activity. As John Stuart Mill stated, "Those only are happy who have their minds fixed on some object other than their own happiness … Aiming thus at something else, they find happiness along the way.

John Hospers proposes three counter-examples to hedonism.Ethics Homepage > The Good > Hedonistic Theories happiness, as concepts substituted for pleasure. A major problem of hedonism is getting clear as of what pleasure and pain consist.

honest upright Great Aunt Sarah who lives alone by a rigid code does not necessarily live a life of pleasure.) III.

Philosophical Dictionary: Hedonism-Heuristic

The hedonist doesn't seek . Virtues and a Good Life Compiled by Mike Garofalo E-Mail. This webpage was last revised, improved, updated or modified on: June 20, This webpage was first published on July 1, There are, in our view, three types of traditional theories of happiness.

Which one you believe has implications for how you lead your life, raise your child, or even cast your vote. First, there is Hedonism. In all its variants, it holds that happiness is a matter of raw subjective feeling. A happy.

Hedonism and the concept of happiness in life

Jeremy Bentham was an English philosopher and political radical. He is primarily known today for his moral philosophy, especially his principle of utilitarianism, which evaluates actions based upon their consequences.

Hedonism and the concept of happiness in life

The relevant consequences, in particular, are the overall happiness created for. Hi, a very interesting post. Your lifestyle does look like taking the best of Stoicism. However, I think it much more resembles the ancient philosophy of Epicureanism (mind you, the current meaning of the word Epicurean is exactly the opposite of what it meant in Ancient Greece).

California State University, Northridge Happiness, Hope, and Optimism by Patricia A. Dunavold (spring ) Introduction. On the surface, happiness, hope, and optimism appear to be three different terms for the same concept.

Hedonistic Theories